SPIE Luminaries

In 2021, SPIE celebrates the work of those who have "lit the way" for research in optics and photonics. Each of these luminaries has made a significant impact on the development of a field that is core to SPIE, including biomedical optics, electronic imaging, optical systems, lens design, neurophotonics, light-based energy research, remote sensing, medical imaging, and nanophotonics. A different luminary will be featured each month.

Bill Arnold

Bill Arnold

William H. "Bill" Arnold, a lifelong lithography expert and an integral part of the SPIE community, passed away on 27 December 2020. Bill was the 2013 SPIE President and served as a Senior Editor for the Journal of Micro/Nanopatterning, Materials, and Metrology (JM3) since it was founded in 2002.

Chris Xu

Chris Xu

Chris Xu is known for his contribution to the development and invention of three-photon microscopy, notably in a 2013 Nature Photonics paper. As a graduate student, Xu, working with Cornell's Watt Webb in Webb’s lab, originally demonstrated three-photon fluorescence imaging in 1996. Today, Xu is the IBM Professor of Engineering and director of the School of Applied and Engineering Physics at Cornell University.

Harrison Barrett

Harrison Barrett

Harrison Barrett is a pioneer in medical imaging, a field which provides unified theories, design principles, and evaluation methods for all forms of imaging. His work has applied the methodologies of image science to astronomy and optical metrology, but his main focus has been medical imaging, where he’s been a longtime leader in developing methods for the assessment and optimization of image quality.

John Pendry

John Pendry

Theoretical physicist John Pendry, a leader in transformation optics, is known for describing the possibility of a “cloaking device”. Across his career Pendry has worked extensively on electronic and structural properties of surfaces, developing the theory of low-energy diffraction and of electronic surface states. He produced a complete theory of the statistics of transport in one-dimensional systems, and his focus on photonic materials led to his research in the electromagnetic properties of metamaterials.

Wolfgang Osten

Wolfgang Osten

During his more than four-decades-long career, SPIE Fellow Wolfgang Osten, a professor at Universität Stuttgart and retired director of the university’s Institute of Technical Optics, has made exceptional contributions to optical metrology. His research focuses on new concepts for industrial inspection and metrology by combining modern principles of optical metrology, sensor technology, and image processing.

Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop

Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop

Physicist Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop is a University of Queensland professor, affiliate professor at the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, and a chief investigator with the Australian Research Council Center of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems. She began her career in atomic physics; her current research interests are in biophotonics, quantum science, laser micromanipulation, laser physics, linear and nonlinear high-resolution spectroscopy, and nano-optics.

Ching Tang

Ching Tang

Ching Tang is one of the founders of organic semiconductor device technology. His landmark work while at the Eastman Kodak Company in the 1980s resulted in the invention of multilayer, small-molecule organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Through these breakthroughs, he and his colleagues demonstrated that organic semiconductors could function in ways analogous to inorganic semiconductors in their ability to transport charge and absorb or emit light.

Bahram Javidi

Bahram Javidi

Across a singular career, SPIE Fellow Bahram Javidi has contributed pioneering optical systems that solve imaging problems in unique ways. Some of his best-known work is in using optical approaches for encryption, but his work has extended across a wide range of imaging problems that have impacted many lines of research. This includes applied areas such as 3D imaging, augmented reality displays, and fundamental optical engineering work in digital holography for automated cell analysis and disease identification.

Bruce Tromberg

Bruce Tromberg

Across his three-decades-plus career, Bruce Tromberg has worked at the nexus of biomedical optics, physics, biology, chemistry, and engineering. In that time, he has developed, translated, and commercialized pioneering technologies in areas such as breast cancer, vascular disease, and metabolism, using light to image and conduct therapy at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. Among other achievements, he has pioneered the development of multiscale tissue optical spectroscopy and imaging technologies for label-free functional imaging.

Shouleh Nikzad

Shouleh Nikzad

Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Fellow and Senior Research Scientist Shouleh Nikzad is recognized internationally for her contributions to ultraviolet (UV), optical, and near-infrared technologies, particularly detectors. Her development of detectors with high sensitivity and tailorable response has enabled UV astrophysics in CubeSat and smallsat platforms, such as the Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) and Dorado, a wide field-of-view mission concept with a primary objective to detect UV counterparts to gravitational waves.


Back to Top
Back to Top