Prof. Julie L. Bentley
Associate Professor at
SPIE Involvement:
Awards Committee | Board of Directors | Education Committee | Information Technology Committee | Scholarship Committee | Fellow status | Conference Program Committee | Conference Chair | Symposium Chair | Editor | Author | Instructor
Publications (28)

SPIE Conference Volume | December 18, 2017

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | November 27, 2017
Proc. SPIE. 10590, International Optical Design Conference 2017

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | November 27, 2017
Proc. SPIE. 10590, International Optical Design Conference 2017
KEYWORDS: Microscopes, Diffraction, Aberration correction, Sensors, Inspection, Control systems, Lens design, Objectives, Vignetting, Zoom lenses

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | May 17, 2016
Proc. SPIE. 9822, Advanced Optics for Defense Applications: UV through LWIR
KEYWORDS: Gradient-index optics, GRIN lenses, Mid-IR, Refractive index, Imaging systems, Ceramics, Diffusion, Refraction, Domes, Optics manufacturing

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | May 17, 2016
Proc. SPIE. 9822, Advanced Optics for Defense Applications: UV through LWIR
KEYWORDS: Optical components, Switches, Imaging systems, Lenses, Fourier transforms, Relays, Infrared radiation, Zoom lenses, Chemical elements, Infrared zoom

SPIE Conference Volume | November 3, 2015

Showing 5 of 28 publications
Conference Committee Involvement (18)
Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XIX
19 August 2018 | San Diego, California, United States
Optifab 2017
16 October 2017 | Rochester, New York, United States
Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVIII
7 August 2017 | San Diego, California, United States
14th Conference on Education and Training in Optics and Photonics, ETOP 2017
28 May 2017 | Hangzhou, China
Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII
31 August 2016 | San Diego, California, United States
Showing 5 of 18 published special sections
Course Instructor
SC935: Introduction to Lens Design
Have you ever needed to specify, design, or analyze a lens system and wondered how to do it or where to start? Would you like a better understanding of the terminology used by lens designers? Are you interested in learning techniques to better utilize your optical design software? Have you always wanted to know what the difference is between spherical aberration and coma or where those crazy optical tolerances come from? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, this course is for you! This full day course begins with a review of basic optics, including paraxial optics, system layout, and lens performance criteria. A discussion of how different system specifications influence the choice of design form, achievable performance, and cost will be presented. Third-order aberration theory, stop shift theory, and induced aberrations are examined in detail. Factors that affect aberrations and the principles of aberration correction are discussed. Demonstrations of computer aided lens design are given accompanied by a discussion of optimization theory, variables and constraints, and local vs. global optimization. Techniques for improving an optical design are illustrated with easy-to-understand examples. The optical fabrication and tolerancing process is explored including an example comparison between a simple copier lens and a complex lithography lens (used to print computer circuit boards) to help explain why some optical designs require precision mechanics and precision assembly and some do not.
SC912: Intermediate Lens Design
Have you ever wondered why refractive, reflective, and zoomed optical systems look the way that they do? This course begins with a brief review of paraxial optics, third-order aberration theory, and computer aided optimization. A survey of refractive optical design forms from the landscape lens to the double gauss lens is given. Telephoto and retrofocus lenses, Petzval and microscope objectives, and wide angle lenses are discussed. Zoom lens principles and first order layout are presented in detail with easy to understand examples. Visible band color correction techniques and UV and IR design constraints are discussed. This full day course also examines the basics of reflective optical system design including refractive design analogies, advantages and disadvantages of reflective systems, obscured vs. unobscured design forms. Reflective systems ranging from the Cassegrain to the reflective triplet to three and four mirror anastigmats are presented.
SC1061: Designing Optical Systems with Manufacturable Aspheres
Have you ever wondered if adding an asphere to your optical system will make it better? Are you interested in learning techniques to incorporate manufacturable aspheres into your optical designs? Would you like a better understanding of where to put an asphere (e.g. location or material) or if you should you use more than one asphere in the your design? Have you always wanted to know what's the best way to specify and tolerance an asphere or even how to constrain the asphere during optimization so that it is manufacturable. If your answer to any of these questions is yes, this course is for you! This course will provide attendees with a broad and useful understanding of how to design with aspheric surfaces and components. Aspheric surfaces in a lens or mirror system can bring significant benefits to the optical performance. This is not without the liabilities of added cost, delivery time, and even producibility. The course will begin with a discussion of how and when to incorporate aspherics into a variety of lens design forms. We present what aspherics will do for a design, and also what they will not do. We will then focus on understanding the differences between the standard polynomial representation and the new Forbes' polynomials for specifying, optimizing, and tolerancing aspheres. Methods to constrain the aspheric profile during optimization to maintain manufacturability will be introduced. The final part of the course will briefly review methods for manufacturing and testing aspheres. This course is a continuation of the long-running course SPIE SC552 - Aspheric Optics, which was established and taught by Robert E. Fischer.
SC690: Optical System Design: Layout Principles and Practice
This course provides the background and principles necessary to understand how optical imaging systems function, allowing you to produce a system layout which will satisfy the performance requirements of your application. This course teaches the methods and techniques of arriving at the first-order layout of an optical system by a process which determines the required components and their locations. This process will produce an image of the right size and in the right location. A special emphasis is placed on understanding the practical aspects of the design of optical systems. Optical system imagery can readily be calculated using the Gaussian cardinal points or by paraxial ray tracing. These principles are extended to the layout and analysis of multi-component systems. This course includes topics such as imaging with thin lenses and systems of thin lenses, stops and pupils, and afocal systems. The course starts by providing the necessary background and theory of first-order optical design followed by numerous examples of optical systems illustrating the design process.
SC690b: Optical System Design: Layout Principles and Practice
This course provides the background and principles necessary to understand how optical imaging systems function, and teaches the simple methods and techniques with which you can lay out a system which will satisfy the performance requirements of your application. Optical system imagery can readily be calculated using the Gaussian cardinal points or by paraxial ray tracing. These principles are extended to the layout and analysis of multi-component systems. This course includes topics such as imaging with thin lenses and systems of thin lenses, stops and pupils, afocal systems, and radiative transfer. Numerous examples of optical systems are described. This course provides simple methods of arriving at, and understanding, the first-order layout of an optical system by a process which determines the required components and their locations. This process will produce an image of the right size and in the right location. A special emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of the design of optical systems.
SC1102: Optical System Design: First Order Layout - Principles and Practices
This course provides the background and principles necessary to understand how optical imaging systems function, allowing you to produce a system layout which will satisfy the performance requirements of your application. This course teaches the methods and techniques of arriving at the first-order layout of an optical system by a process which determines the required components and their locations. This process will produce an image of the right size and in the right location. A special emphasis is placed on understanding the practical aspects of the design of optical systems. Optical system imagery can readily be calculated using the Gaussian cardinal points or by paraxial ray tracing. These principles are extended to the layout and analysis of multi-component systems. This course includes topics such as imaging with thin lenses and systems of thin lenses, stops and pupils, and afocal systems. The course starts by providing the necessary background and theory of first-order optical design followed by numerous examples of optical systems illustrating the design process.
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